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Vicki Smith and Brian Halpin have been awarded a UCD Center for Poverty Research Graduate Student Research Fellowship

The fellowship will support Brian's work interviewing low-wage workers for a larger study of the employability strategies of people stuck in low-wage labor markets. The research will take place in the Napa/Sonoma area.

Vicki Smith and Brian Halpin have been awarded a UCD Center for Poverty Research Graduate Student Research Fellowship - Read More…

Vicki Smith is the 2012-13 Chair of the ASA Economic Sociology Section

The Economic Sociology Section is the 8th largest of the ASA's 52 sections. Vicki served as Chair-Elect for this position in 2011-12. She will be working with a contingent of UCD economic sociologists--both faculty and graduate students--to produce the section newsletters and organize the section round tables at the 2013 New York City meetings. UCD has a long affiliation with the subfield of economic sociology: colleagues Nicole Biggart and Fred Block were some of the movers and shakers behind the formation of this section in 2000; Biggart was also elected to chair it (2004-05).

Vicki Smith is the 2012-13 Chair of the ASA Economic Sociology Section - Read More…

Cara Chiaraluce awarded the Cross- UC Medical Humanities Fellowship for 2012-2013

Fellows pursue individualized research projects relating to the theme of "language and de/humanization in a medical setting." During the academic year, she also will be participating in themed monthly discussion groups with multi-disciplinary scholars held at the UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento.

Cara Chiaraluce awarded the Cross- UC Medical Humanities Fellowship for 2012-2013 - Read More…

Robin Pleau's article shortlisted for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Family Research.

Robin Pleau's article, "Gender Differences in Postretirement Employment" published in Research on Aging, was shortlisted for this yearly award. The award is given to the author(s) of the best research paper published in 2010. The finalists are selected via a rigorous process. A committee of over 35 leading scholars, from five countries, examined over 2500 articles published in 77 leading English-language journals from around the world. A three-stage process led to the final selections. No external nominations were solicited or accepted. Robin's papers and ten others were chosen for the shortlist.

Robin Pleau's article shortlisted for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Family Research. - Read More…

Dina Okamoto was elected to the ASA Council, Member-at-Large.

The ASA Council is the governing body of the American Sociological Association, which is dedicated to advancing sociology as a scientific discipline and profession serving the public good. With over 14,000 members, ASA encompasses sociologists who are faculty members at colleges and universities, researchers, practitioners, and students. Working at the national and international levels, the Association aims to articulate policy and implement programs likely to have the broadest possible impact for sociology now and in the future. The ASA Council is responsible for the formulation of policy and the general direction of the affairs of the Association.

Dina Okamoto was elected to the ASA Council, Member-at-Large. - Read More…

Mindy Romero's Research Receives Television and Radio Press

As Project Director of the UC Davis California Civic Engagement Project, Mindy just released the first in a series of policy briefs. The brief outlines her research on voter registration disparity for Asian and Latino populations. Although Latinos and Asians make up half of California's population, they register to vote in far smaller percentages. The voter registration gap means that these ethnic groups have proportionately less say in the electoral process compared to the general population. Read about the exiting press the research has received, including Mindy's interview on CPR's Insight. http://regionalchange.ucdavis.edu/projects/ccep-in-the-media

Mindy Romero's Research Receives Television and Radio Press - Read More…

Jane Le Skaife is the 2012-2013 recipient of the Southeast Asian Archive Anne Frank Visiting Researcher Award

The Southeast Asian Archive is a unit of the Department of Special Collections and Archives in the University of California, Irvine Libraries. It was established in 1987 to document the experiences of refugees and immigrants from Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam (the countries of the former Indochina) who resettled in the United States after the end of the Vietnam War in 1975. The archive collects materials relating to the resettlement of these refugees in the United States (and to a lesser extent, worldwide), the development and growth of Southeast Asian American communities, and the culture and history of Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. The archive's collection is the strongest of its kind in the U.S. Jane Le Skaife is the 2012-2013 recipient of the Southeast Asian Archive Anne Frank Visiting Researcher Award, named after the founding librarian of the archive and made possible by an anonymous donor. http://seaa.lib.uci.edu/seaa-research-award.html

Jane Le Skaife is the 2012-2013 recipient of the Southeast Asian Archive Anne Frank Visiting Researcher Award - Read More…

Mindy Romero's Research Cited in the Sunday LA Times and Associated Press.

Mindy's recent research continues to be cited by a wide range of media sources during the election season. Recently, she released policy briefs analyzing Latino and Asian voter registration, as well as the state of youth (18-24) voter registration in California. In addition to the LA Times and AP, Mindy and her work have also been quoted in two front page Sac Bee articles, HuffPost Voces. and a variety of other newspaper, radio and television pieces. Here is a link to the full media coverage of her work....http://regionalchange.ucdavis.edu/projects/ccep-in-the-media

Mindy Romero's Research Cited in the Sunday LA Times and Associated Press. - Read More…

Bill McCarthy and colleagues article on sex work legislation published in the Annual Review of Law and Social Science Volume 8, 255-71.

Written with Cecilia Benoit, Mikeal Jansson and Kat Kolar, this paper, "Regulating Sex Work: Heterogeneity in Legal Strategies" examines various legal strategies used to regulate the sale and purchase of sexual services. It discusses laws directed toward the control of three groups: sellers, buyers, and third parties. It focuses on three common legal strategies (full criminalization, partial decriminalization, and full decriminalization) and presents a critical assessment of each legal approach.

Bill McCarthy and colleagues article on sex work legislation published in the Annual Review of Law and Social Science Volume 8, 255-71. - Read More…

Former graduate student and current Ohio University Professor Ursula Castellano publishes dissertation monograph.

"Outsourcing Justice," published this month, is based on Ursula's ethnographic dissertation project on the role of nonprofits in a local criminal justice system.

Former graduate student and current Ohio University Professor Ursula Castellano publishes dissertation monograph. - Read More…

Bill McCarthy and Eric Grodsky's article "Sex in School: Adolescent Sex and Education" will be published in the May 2011 issue of Social Problems

Bill McCarthy and Eric Grodsky presented the paper at last summer’s ASA meetings and the paper generated considerable interest. The paper was summarized by Alicia Chang, a science writer from the Associated Press, and reprinted in several hundred newspapers from around the world.

Bill McCarthy and Eric Grodsky's article "Sex in School: Adolescent Sex and Education" will be published in the May 2011 issue of Social Problems - Read More…

Ryken Grattet's article "Supervision Regimes, Risk, and Official Reactions to Parolee Deviance" published in the May issue of Criminology

Ryken Grattet, Jeffrey Lin, and Joan Petersilia’s article draws on data collected in the California Parole Study, funded by the National Institute of Justice, to examine the role of parole supervision in accounting for the extraordinarily high rate of parole violations among California parolees. The article considers how parolees risks of violations is affected by how they are supervised.

Ryken Grattet's article "Supervision Regimes, Risk, and Official Reactions to Parolee Deviance" published in the May issue of Criminology - Read More…

CNN coverage focuses on Professors Bob Faris and Diane Felmlee's research on bullying

CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360° recently partnered with UC Davis sociologists Robert Faris and Diane Felmlee to engage in a systematic social network analysis of school bullying and aggression. The results of the study have been the focus of a weeklong series of events on CNN, including a Town Hall meeting, interviews with Faris and Felmlee, articles on the CNN website, and taped segments summarizing the findings of the Faris and Felmlee’s research.

CNN coverage focuses on Professors Bob Faris and Diane Felmlee's research on bullying - Read More…

Special Inaugural Sociology Colloquium: A talk by Evelyn Nakano Glenn, UC-Berkeley

"Precarious Citizenship and the Fight for Public Education" A talk by Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Professor of Ethnic and Asian American Studies & former President of the American Sociological Association (2010) will be held on Thursday, December 8, 2011, 10:30-12:00 in the Andrews Conference Room, SS&H 2203 RSVP: mudge@ucdavis.edu

Special Inaugural Sociology Colloquium: A talk by Evelyn Nakano Glenn, UC-Berkeley - Read More…

Sociology Colloquia March 1, John Hipp: Living in your own "Private Idaho": Egohoods as a New Measure of Neighborhood

Defining "neighborhoods" is a bedeviling challenge faced by all studies of neighborhood effects and ecological models of social processes. Although scholars frequently lament the inadequacies of the various existing definitions of "neighborhood", we argue that previous strategies relying on non-overlapping boundaries such as block groups and tracts are fundamentally flawed. The approach taken here instead builds on insights of the mental mapping literature, the social networks literature, the daily activities pattern literature, and the travel to crime literature to propose a new definition of neighborhoods: egohoods. These egohoods are conceptualized as waves washing across the surface of cities, as opposed to independent units with non-overlapping boundaries. This approach is illustrated using crime data from seven cities, and the results show that measures aggregated to our egohoods explain about twice as much of the variation in crime across the social environment than do models with measures aggregated to block groups or tracts. Results also suggest that measuring inequality in egohoods provides dramatically stronger effects on crime rates than when using the non-overlapping boundary approach, highlighting the important new insights that can be obtained by utilizing our egohood approach.

Sociology Colloquia March 1, John Hipp: Living in your own "Private Idaho": Egohoods as a New Measure of Neighborhood - Read More…

Diane Wolf selected to editorial board

Diane Wolf has been invited to join the editorial board of a new book series, "Studies of Jews in Society," sponsored by the Association for the Social Scientific Study of Jewry and published by University of Nebraska Press.

Diane Wolf selected to editorial board - Read More…

Diane Wolf keynote speaker

Diane Wolf will be the keynote speaker at a special event for the University of Colorado's Holocaust Awareness Week January 23-27). Her talk "Hidden Children of the Holocaust," is based on her book, "Beyond Anne Frank: Jewish Families in Postwar Holland" for which she interviewed 70 former "hidden children." The talk will discuss the ways in which genocide strained relationships between Jewish parents and their children who were placed in hiding. Read more: http://www.coloradodaily.com/ci_19791273#axzz1kJOfDT7d

Diane Wolf keynote speaker - Read More…

Jennifer Haylett forthcoming publication

"One Woman Helping Another: Egg Donation as a Case of Relational Work" has been accepted for publication in the June 2012 special relational work issue of the journal Politics and Society.

Jennifer Haylett forthcoming publication - Read More…

Raoul S. Lievanos forthcoming publication

"Certainty, Fairness, and Balance: State Resonance and Environmental Justice Policy Implementation," will appear in the June 2012 (Vol. 27, No. 2) issue of Sociological Forum. The publication draws on research Lievanos completed for his qualifying paper in the sociology department and elaborates on recent arguments put forth by Lievanos and co-authors Jonathan K. London and Julie Sze in Technoscience and Environmental Justice: Expert Cultures in a Grassroots Movement, edited by G. Ottinger and B. R. Cohen (MIT Press, 2011).

Raoul S. Lievanos forthcoming publication - Read More…

David Orzechowicz selected for 2012-2013 Professors for the Future program

Professors for the Future is a year-long competitive fellowship program designed to recognize and develop the leadership skills of outstanding graduate students and postdoctoral scholars who have demonstrated their commitment to professionalism, integrity, and academic service. This unique program sponsored by the Office of Graduate Studies focuses on the future challenges of graduate education, postdoctoral training, and the academy. Professors for the Future (PFTF) is designed to prepare UC Davis doctoral students and postdoctoral scholars for an increasingly competitive marketplace and a rapidly changing university environment. PFTF Fellows receive a $3,000 stipend.

David Orzechowicz selected for 2012-2013 Professors for the Future program - Read More…

Daniel Herda awarded a Dissertation-Year Fellowship for 2012-2013

Daniel Herda has received a UC Davis Dissertation Fellowship for his research on racial discrimination experiences. The first of his three studies examines the degree to which such hostile interracial encounters can engender negative attitudes among reported victims. The second focuses on how neighborhood racial composition influences the likelihood of experiencing discrimination among young respondents. The final study examines the mental health and behavioral consequences of adolescents' discrimination fears and parents' discrimination experiences to determine whether discrimination can be detrimental even in the absence of actual experience.

Daniel Herda awarded a Dissertation-Year Fellowship for 2012-2013 - Read More…